CANYON MEDICAL CENTER
Phone: (702)-220-8001
http://www.canyonmedicalcenterlv.com
URGENT CARE / PRIMARYCARE / MEDICAL CLINIC
5061 NORTH RAINBOW BLVD # 180
LAS VEGAS, NV 89130


What Are High Blood Pressure and Prehypertension?

Blood pressure is the force of blood against the walls of arteries. Blood pressure rises
and falls throughout the day. When blood pressure stays elevated over time, it’s called
high blood pressure.

The medical term for high blood pressure is hypertension. High blood pressure is dangerous
because it makes the heart work too hard and contributes to atherosclerosis (hardening
of the arteries). It increases the risk of heart disease (see box 1) and stroke, which are the
first- and third-leading causes of death among Americans. High blood pressure also can
result in other conditions, such as congestive heart failure, kidney disease, and blindness.
A blood pressure level of 140/90 mmHg or higher is considered high. About two-thirds
of people over age 65 have high blood pressure. If your blood pressure is between
120/80 mmHg and 139/89 mmHg, then you have prehypertension. This means that you
don’t have high blood pressure now but are likely to develop it in the future unless you
adopt the healthy lifestyle changes described in this brochure. (See box 2.)
People who do not have high blood pressure at age 55 face a 90 percent chance of
developing it during their lifetimes. So high blood pressure is a condition that most
people will have at some point in their lives.
Both numbers in a blood pressure test are important, but for people who are age 50
or older, systolic pressure gives the most accurate diagnosis of high blood pressure.
Systolic pressure is the top number in a blood pressure reading. It is high if it is
140 mmHg or above.
Risk Factors for Heart Disease
Risk factors are conditions or behaviors that increase your chances of developing a disease. When you have
more than one risk factor for heart disease, your risk of developing heart disease greatly multiplies. So if
you have high blood pressure, you need to take action. Fortunately, you can control most heart disease
risk factors.

Risk factors you can control: Risk factors beyond your control:

High blood pressure • Age (55 or older for men; 65 or older for women)
Abnormal cholesterol• Family history of early heart disease (having a father or
•Tobacco use brother diagnosed with heart disease before age 55 or
Diabetes having a mother or sister diagnosed before age 65)
Overweight
Physical inactivity



Heart disease is the top killer of men and women.
Learn the signs of a heart attack and the steps to take if one happens. You can save a life–maybe your own.

Treatment can stop a heart attack in its tracks.
Clot-busting drugs and other artery-opening treatments work best to stop a heart attack if given within 1 hour of the start of symptoms.

Information To Share With Emergency Medical Personnel/Hospital Staff
Medicines you are taking: Medicines you are allergic to: If symptoms stop completely in less than 5 minutes, you should still call your health care provider.
▲ Learn the heart attack warning signs. Talk with family and friends about them and the need to call 9-1-1 quickly.
▲ Talk with your health care provider about your risk factors for heart attack–and how to reduce them.

Plan Ahead
Chest Discomfort
Uncomfortable pressure, squeezing, fullness, or pain in the center of the chest that lasts more than a few minutes, or goes away and comes back.
▲ Discomfort in Other Areas of the Upper Body
Can include pain or discomfort in one or both arms, the back, neck, jaw, or stomach.
Shortness of Breath
Often comes with or before chest discomfort.
▲ Other Signs
May include breaking out in a cold sweat, nausea, or light-headedness.

Heart Attack Warning Signs Minutes Matter
▲ If you or someone else is having heart attack warning signs:
Call 9-1-1
▲ Don’t wait more than a few minutes—
5 minutes at most—to call 9-1-1.
▲ If symptoms stop completely in less than 5 minutes, you should still call your health care provider

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High blood cholesterol can affect anyone. It’s a serious condition that increases the risk for heart disease, the number one killer of Americans—women and men. The higher your blood cholesterol level, the greater your risk.

If there is too much cholesterol in the blood, some of the excess can become trapped in artery walls. Over time, this builds up and is called plaque. The plaque can narrow vessels and make them less flexible, a condition called atherosclerosis or “hardening of the
arteries.” This process can happen to blood vessels anywhere in the body, including those of the heart, brain, kidneys, legs.

Risk factors are conditions or behaviors that increase your chance of developing a disease. For heart disease, there are two types of risk factors—those you can’t change and those you can. Fortunately,
most of the heart disease risk factors can be changed.

Risk factors you can’t change
● Age—45 or older for men; 55 or older for women
● Family history of early heart disease—father or brother diagnosed before age 55, or mother or sister diagnosed before age 65
Risk factors you can change
Smoking
High blood pressure
High blood cholesterol
Overweight/obesity
Physical inactivity
Diabetes

Knowing Your Cholesterol Level
You can have high cholesterol and not realize it. Most of the 65 million Americans with high cholesterol have no symptoms. So it’s important to have your blood cholesterol levels checked.
A typical path to success to reduce Cholesterol would be:
First Doctor Visit—Start Lifestyle Changes
● Reduce saturated fat, trans fat, and cholesterol.
● Increase physical activity moderately.
● If overweight, reduce calories—increase fiber-rich foods to
help reduce calorie intake.
—Allow 6 weeks—
Second Doctor Visit—Check LDL and, If Needed, Add More Dietary Approaches
● Reinforce reduction of saturated fat, trans fat, and cholesterol.
● Add plant stanols/sterols.
● Increase soluble fiber.
—Allow 6 weeks—
Third Doctor Visit—Check LDL and, If Needed, Add Drug Therapy
● Start drug therapy for LDL lowering, if needed.
● Focus on treatment of metabolic syndrome (see pages 70–72)—
reinforce weight management and physical activity.
—Every 4 to 6 months— Keep Checking Progress

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COPD is the 4th leading cause of death in the United States and causes serious, long-term disability. The number of people with COPD is increasing. More than 12 million people are currently diagnosed with COPD and an additional 12 million likely have the disease and don’t even know it.
But there is reason for hope. You’ve taken the first step by being aware of your symptoms and seeing your doctor for testing and diagnosis. Now that you know you have COPD, your doctor can suggest treatment options and ways to help you manage COPD and improve your quality of life.
what is copd?
COPD is a serious lung disease that over time makes it hard to breathe. You may also have heard COPD called by other names, like emphysema or chronic bronchitis.
In people who have COPD, the airways—tubes that carry air in and out of your lungs—are partially blocked, which makes it hard for the air to get in and out. COPD develops slowly and worsens over time, so be sure to call your doctor to report any new symptoms or if your current symptoms get worse.
when you are diagnosed with copd
There are many things that you can do to make living with COPD easier:
Quit Smoking
If you smoke, the best thing you can do to prevent more damage to your lungs is to quit. Ask your doctor about new options for quitting.
Avoid Exposure to Pollutants
Try to stay away from other things that could irritate your lungs, like dust and strong fumes. Stay indoors when the outside air quality is poor. You should also stay away from places where there might be cigarette smoke.
Visit Your Doctor on a Regular Basis
See your doctor regularly, even if you are feeling fine. Be sure to bring a list of all medicines you are taking to each doctor’s visit.
Follow Treatment Advice
Be sure to take your medications and follow your doctor’s advice on how to treat your disease. If you have any questions—ASK!
Talk with your doctor about treatment options. You can take steps to make breathing easier and live a longer and more active life.

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